For access to the digital issue, go to:

Tobacconistmagazine.com/issues

 

March/April 2016
Vol. 27, No. 1

FEATURES

Cigar Art
Eric Whitfield and Joyful Stoves seem to have found the perfect formula for their respective creative energies: combining their passion for artistic expression with their love of cigars.

Resurrection Man
Taking inspiration from the past, Kurt Kendall resurrects the 19th-century cigar brand 7-20-4 for a 21st-century consumer. The result is a mighty fine smoke.

Carrying the Torch
When Michael Cafagno took ownership of The Tobacconist of Greenwich in 2006, he made a promise to never forget the legacy of founder Jimmy Lacerra. Consider that promise kept.

National Pride: Nicaraguan Cigar Festival
It’s a burden, but it’s the sacrifice we must bear. We traveled south to the tropical comforts of Nicaragua for the fifth annual Puro Sabor festival. The things we do for our readers.

Business: Creating a House Brand
There’s always a market for unique, one-of-a-kind merchandise, and tobacco shops are no exception. Consider developing a house brand and have a step up on your competition.

Business: An IOU for the IRS
Just about the worst thing you can do when it comes to dealing with the IRS is to not pay your bill. If you find yourself struggling to pay, there are options available that will keep your tax record clean.

Business: Boutique vs. Major Brands
What’s the right balance for a tobacconist’s humidor? Do major brands dominate your shelves, or are you always trying to have the next big thing before it becomes the next big thing? We take a closer look.

Business: How to Pull the Strings Your Way
Local politicians can have a profound effect, both positive and negative, on small-business operations. So how does a small-business owner manage these potential minefields when dealing with their bottom line? It’s all about relationships.

Guest Column: Jorge Armenteros
When Jorge Armenteros decided to expand his tobacconist shop, he thought his focus would be working with an architect and finding the right furniture. But it was the local health inspector that took up most of his time.